Posts Tagged ‘Harry Potter’

News & Submissions 10/4/2011

Tuesday, October 4th, 2011

Arts & Entertainment:

Harry Potter tour hopes to cast spell on UK Muggles
As all good students of the Harry Potter saga know well, Muggles are not usually allowed at Hogwarts school of witchcraft of wizardry. However, a new exhibition will soon give those not gifted with magical powers the chance to see some of the famous Potter film sets, such as the Great Hall and Dumbledore’s office, for themselves. Read full story from

The enchantments of witch fiction
Being a witch or wizard in the Potterverse, or in many other magical landscapes, is an exciting and desirable state – special, talented, glamorously outside the norm.  But there are also contexts in children’s literature, particularly in historical fiction, fantasy or the bleed-space between genres, in which a little magic – or just the suspicion of it – is a dangerous thing.  To be accused of witchcraft, whether truthfully, maliciously or both, may cause characters to be shunned or tormented by their communities, interrogated by frightening figures of authority, or even put to death if their luck runs finally out. Read full story from


30 Million Plastic Bags Collected by School Kids to Save a Species
They’re like little troll dolls with tails. These super cute and super tiny animals are Cotton-Top Tamarins, found only in Columbia, and they’re about to disappear from the wild. But clever strategies for saving the forest in which they live have been devised by Proyecto Tití, from collecting plastic bags polluting the forest and turning them into marketable products to finding new sources of cooking fuel that spares trees. Read full story from


‘Witch’ hunt continues in Rajasthan
Bhilwara (Rajasthan): A 60-year-old woman in Rajasthan’s Bhilwara says she was branded a witch, tortured and banished from her village, police said on Tuesday.

The incident took place in Fuliakhurd village in Bhilwara district, some 250 km from state capital Jaipur, and a case has been registered against four villagers. Police say an inquiry has been ordered.

“A group of people broke open the door of my house on Monday and started beating me. They held me by my hair and dragged me, saying I was a ‘dayan’ (witch). Then they ordered me to leave the village immediately,” the woman said in her complaint.

“They ostracised her and claimed that she was a ‘dayan’ (witch) and possessed an evil spirit,” a senior police officer said. Read full story from


Strange YouTube video claims Irish college hosts Satanic church – VIDEO
Here’s a strange one to start the week with.

According to Irish third level website, University College Cork — better known for recently accumulating such accolades as a five star quality rating from QS, and the Sunday Times Irish University of the Year — is in fact also playing host to a satanic religious institution on its main campus.

The Honan Chapel, known to students as the on-campus chapel, and also a popular wedding venue for those a little past their college-going years, boasts eerie satantic imagery according to this video from YouTube. Read full story from

Attacks on Buddhists in Southern Region of Thailand
Bangkok, Thailand (CHAKRA)—In the southern region of the Narathiwat province, three consecutive bomb explosions killed four Malaysians as well as a Thai volunteer that was working in a tourist area. Concern has risen for the area, especially because officials believe that the targets of such blasts are foreign tourists. The specific targets of the blasts were a hotel and a Chinese-Thai cultural center, which were both partly damaged. These spoils have reminded the government of the ethnic minority problems that exist in the south. Read full story from


Samhain — Nature’s Holy Day for Managing Seasonal Affective Disorder
In the Northern Hemisphere, neopagans celebrate Samhain as the last harvest, the point at which the day has shortened and winter is setting in. Some modern pagans consider it the “witch’s new year,” though in other traditions, Samhain marked only the end of the year. The beginning of the year, the “new year,” came with the promise of light’s return at Yule, several weeks later. The span between the two stellar points was considered untime — a sacred experience outside our usual observation of time and space. Thus, an understanding of cyclic “Dead Time,” or “Dark Time,” entered our consciousness. Read full story from


Dalai Lama scraps trip to South Africa; Tutu lashes out (Source: CNN)


  • Capital Witch – Starhawk and Pagan Cluster to Occupy Freedom Plaza
  • Daughters of Eve – Lost in Translation… or maybe not
  • Patheos – Don’t Worry, Wicca Isn’t A Real Religion (A Rant)
  • The Wild Hunt – Virginia Court Says Divination Not A Religious Practice

Feel free to leave comments regarding the articles posted.

If you’re interested in guest blogging or would like to submit an article or event, contact me at

Thanks for stopping by! Well wishes to you all, have a great day!


News & Submissions 8/2/2011

Tuesday, August 2nd, 2011

Arts & Entertainment:

Gif Recap: ‘True Blood’
Oh, yes.  It’s finally happened!  Sookie and Eric!  Well, that is until King Bill walks in on them.  Damn it Bill!  Royal or not, you have crappy timing!  We wanted to see some Sookie/Eric sex!  And really, Sookie shouldn’t have stopped Eric from staking Bill with that poker.  Instead, Eric kneels before his liege.  Oh, that isn’t going to end well. Read full story from

Harry Potter joins the billion dollar club
With his last movie gasp, Harry Potter has finally joined the billion dollar club after a strikingly successful weekend at US cinemas.

Figures show that Deathly Hallows: Part 2, the eighth and final instalment of the boy wizard franchise, has surpassed $1bn (£615m) in global box office returns. The previous best of the series was $974.8m set by the first movie 10 years ago, Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone. Read full story from


Nationwide pow wow calendar covering all events including Gathering of the Nations and more. Check for the next Pow wow in your state or city.

“The Response” Promises Toxic Mix of Racism and Bigotry
A mix of racism and bigotry against American Indians, Palestinians, Muslims, Jews, gay people and others is the backdrop to a mass rally billed as “A National Day of Prayer” that will take place in Texas the first weekend in August.

August 3 , 2011 – Open Lughnasadh/Lammas Ritual (Bring a DISH)
Merry Meet! Come and join in the celebration of the next turninsg of the wheel. 13 Magickal Moons is hosting an Open Lughnassad/Lammas Ritual on Wednesday August 3 at 7:30pm during Tea Nite. Join us for an evening of magick and mystery! Bring a dish to share and be sure to dress accordingly for the weather!!!


Woman killed over suspected sorcery
BARIPADA: A 45-year-old woman was arrested from Thakurmunda area in Mayurbhanj district for allegedly killing a tribal woman suspecting her to be practising sorcery. The accused Jaba Tudu was produced in the court on Monday and remanded in judicial custody.

Police sources said Tudu, a resident of Nunadiha village, beheaded Jamuna Hansda (55) suspecting that the latter practised black magic on her husband. Read full story from


Druid Heights in Marin County
On August 11th the Golden Gate National Park Conservatory is offering an exciting opportunity and no doubt local Pagans will want to get in on this deal.  For on the 11th there will be a hike to Druid Heights in Marin; which is located just above Muir Woods.

Local Pagans might have heard of Druid Heights, but then again, the area has been kept so secret that maybe they haven’t.  The community is typically off limits to hikers and random visitors, but for only two days this summer (the first was July 30th) a lucky group of people will be treated to a hike and evening of amazing poetry amongst the beautiful architecture that is known as Druid Heights. Read full story from

The Hindu secularists : Liberals or Hypocrites?
Today, we can find many people who are quick to christen famous Hindu gurus as “dhongis” and “pakhandi”. Such people generally hold the view that to become a guru all one needs is to chant a few mantras and promote the supertitions. These people think that the millions who follow the advice and teachings of such gurus are “fools” and ignorant of the modern science. Moreover, they not only percieve Hinduism as a mix of cast system, dowry, sati pratha etc but also use these assumptions as a basic elements of their argument to further denigrate their own culture and the ancient knowledge. These are the set of people who have never read even the bhagvad-Gita, the works of the world famous scholar Sri Aurobindo or the testimonials of the famous scientists like Heisenberg, Nicholas Tesla, Albert Einstein etc. Read full story from


Understanding the religious history of the Knights Templar
The group has come to everyone’s attention because of Anders Behring Breivik’s killing spree in Norway, now just over a week ago. He claimed in his rambling manifesto to represent a modern-day “Knights Templar”. Read full story from

Sect Leader Warren Jeffs Defends Polygamy, Threatens Court With ‘Sickness and Death’ From God
Polygamist sect leader Warren Jeffs may be the one on trial, but he told court officials that if they don’t stop prosecuting him on two counts of sexual assault of a child, they would face an even bigger problem — the wrath of God. Read full story from


Feel free to leave comments regarding the articles posted.

If you’re interested in guest blogging or would like to submit an article or event, contact me at

Thanks for stopping by! Well wishes to you all, have a great day!


News & Submissions 7/14/2011

Thursday, July 14th, 2011


Study Sheds New Light on Archaeology of the Dura-Europos Expedition
A recent study of the photographic archives of one of the 20th century’s most sensational archaeological excavations and discoveries lends powerful credence to the phrase “a picture is worth a thousand words”. Tucked away carefully within the archival collections of the Yale University Art Gallery in New Haven, Connecticut, more than 5,000 unpublished photographs taken between 1928 and 1937 recount a story in visual detail that cannot be fully told in the printed words of excavation reports, site journals or the popular press of the time. Read full story from

Native American:

Cherokee Nation becomes First Tribe to receive Electronic Health Records Incentive
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. — The Cherokee Nation recently received the first incentive payment from the Oklahoma State Medicaid Electronic Health Record incentive program for its implementation and use of electronic health records at W. W. Hastings Hospital in Tahlequah. The tribe started using electronic records in its nine health centers and the hospital more than seven years ago but recently certified its system, enabling Cherokee Nation to become the first tribe eligible to receive the incentive payment.

The first installment of the incentive payment was $21,250 and was presented to Dr. Greggory Woitte, a provider who qualified for the incentive at Cherokee Nation’s Hastings Hospital. Woitte qualified by having a specified percentage of his patients on SoonerCare, Medicare and Medicaid while utilizing the electronic health records system. Read full story from


Gay Couple Told to Move to Back of Bus
Singer Ari Gold and his boyfriend were told to move to the back of the bus for holding hands, he said Sunday on Facebook.

When Gold refused, the Shortline bus driver pulled over and called the police.

Gold said “we were both listening to Whitney Houston on an iPod double jack and loving her love songs,” and holding hands, when the driver pulled over to tell us to “stop sitting in the front.” Gold said no, “and that’s when the driver called the state trooper.” Read full story from

Romney, Pawlenty say no to controversial marriage pledge
Republicans Mitt Romney and Tim Pawlenty will not sign a controversial marriage pledge pushed by a conservative Iowa group.

The pledge by the Family Leader calls on candidates to support marriage between a man and a woman and to reject same-sex marriage, pornography and Islamic sharia law, among other issues.

The conservative group, which plays a key role in the Iowa presidential caucuses, removed controversial language from the pledge’s preamble that suggested black children born into slavery had a better family situation than black children today. Read full story from


7 Conservation Photographers Saving The Planet Through Amazing Pictures
Conservation photography
may be a discipline you’ve never heard of. While the foundations have been around since the beginning of photography itself — using images to make people aware of, and respond to, environmental issues — the genre has only been given a name in the last few years. And yet, it is one area in which some of the best photographers in the world are spending their energies, using the power of photos to conserve natural spaces. Meet seven of the best in the business, and see their stunning shots. Read full story from


Irish report damns Catholic Church abuse response
The Catholic Church in Ireland did not take serious steps to stamp out child abuse by priests even after the scandal blew up worldwide and the Irish bishops put rules in place to stop it, a new report says.

The Cloyne report demolishes claims by the Catholic Church there that policies it put in place in 1996 have enabled it to get a handle on the problem. Read full story from

A pledge, not prayer, for politicians
Congratulations to the Salisbury City Council for doing something that President Barack Obama and the Republicans can’t seem to do: come up with a compromise. Where congressional Republicans seem to think compromise constitutes collaboration (alliteration alert!), members of the Salisbury City Council see compromise as the hybrid fruit of the democratic process.

And huzzah to all that!

Of course, the matter on which the Salisburians compromised has no place in an American government setting, but you still have to appreciate their regard for accommodation.

The Salisburians had to decide if it’s appropriate to open City Council meetings with the Lord’s Prayer. Read full story from

Why we’re drawn to Harry Potter’s theology
It’s been 13 years since the first Harry Potter book landed on store shelves and provoked some Christian conservatives to begin voicing opposition to J.K. Rowling’s world of wizardry.

“Let me say something about Harry Potter. Warlocks are enemies of God,” said Becky Fischer, a Pentecostal pastor featured in a documentary called Jesus Camp. “And I don’t care what kind of hero they are, they’re an enemy of God.”

“Had it been in the Old Testament,” Fischer continued, “Harry Potter would have been put to death. You don’t make heroes out of warlocks.” Read full story from

Austrian driver’s religious headgear strains credulity
An Austrian atheist has won the right to be shown on his driving-licence photo wearing a pasta strainer as “religious headgear”.

Niko Alm first applied for the licence three years ago after reading that headgear was allowed in official pictures only for confessional reasons.

Mr Alm said the sieve was a requirement of his religion, pastafarianism.

The Austrian authorities required him to obtain a doctor’s certificate that he was “psychologically fit” to drive. Read full story from


Criticism, lawsuit plague prayer rally
AUSTIN (KXAN) – Next month’s mega prayer rally – The Response – at Houston’s Reliant Stadium could be in trouble. On Wednesday, a group called the ” Freedom From Religion Foundation ” filed a federal lawsuit to stop Gov. Rick Perry from taking part.

Atheists and agnostics make up the organization and say Perry is violating the constitutional ban on the government establishing a religion. They have also asked the court to keep the governor from participating in the meeting or using his office to promote or recognize it. Read full story from

Extremely Rare Leopards Caught on Film in Russia
Catching a glimpse of just one critically endangered Armur leopard is enough to wow any nature lover, but spotting a dozen is rarity indeed. Film footage released today by WWF, obtained from camera traps in the remote forests of the Russian Far East, is offering a welcome indication that the imperiled leopards may be making a comeback. With fewer than 50 of the big cats thought to be in existence in the wild, the appearance of 12 individuals in the latest video survey has wildlife experts feeling a bit more optimistic about the leopards’ future. Read full story from


Feel free to leave comments regarding the articles posted.

If you’re interested in guest blogging or would like to submit an article or event, contact me at

Thanks for stopping by! Well wishes to you all, have a great day!


News & Submissions 7/12/2011

Tuesday, July 12th, 2011


The lost city where the Olympics began may have been destroyed by tsunamis
— The Olympic Games first began in the ancient Greek city-state of Olympia. For all its fame, the city suffered a mysterious fate, destroyed by an unknown natural disaster. Now it looks like tsunamis were the culprit…despite being 30 kilometers inland.

The origins of the ancient Olympics are shrouded in mystery, but the generally accepted date for the first Olympiad is 776 BCE, and the games endured for an incredible 1,170 years before the Emperor Theodosius I suppressed them in 394 CE because they were too reminiscent of paganism. The city remained inhabited for another 150 or so years, but by around 551 CE Olympia lay in ruins, and it wouldn’t be until 1829 that it would be rediscovered and excavations could begin. Read full story from

Bronze Age house from Israel uncovered
Archaeological work during the first season at Tel Shikmona, on the southern edge of Israel’s city of Haifa, has uncovered the remains of a house dating back 3000 years. The site was originally excavated about 40 years ago, but neglect, off road vehicles and the build up of rubbish meant that the site became obscured from view and lay all but forgotten.

Tel Shikmona is located in the Shikmona Nature Reserve and National Park, managed by the Israel Nature and Parks Authority. It was originally excavated by Yosef Algavish on behalf of the Municipality of Haifa, when remains of settlement dating from the late Bronze Age (16th century BCE) to the Muslim period of the 7th century CE were uncovered. Read full story from

Arts & Entertainment:

Is new Harry Potter movie one more two-hour recruiting film for the occult?
The final Harry Potter movie opens Friday, but Steve Wohlberg, author of Exposing Harry Potter and Witchcraft, is worried that it’s one more two-hour recruiting film for the occult.

“The Pottermania will experience one last spasm as the Grand Finale of Harry Potter movies, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Part 2),” he writes. “When the book was released in July 2007, 11 million copies sold in 24 hours, making it the fastest selling book in history. Read full story from

Okay. Breathe. ‘Evil Dead’ Remake Is Happening.
I must not assume the worst. I must not assume the worst. I must not assume the worst…

I’ll spare you the rest of my lines (they’re etched on my hand Harry Potter 5 style) and get to the point.

Yesterday Dread Central reported that a new Evil Dead film looked to be going into production. I know, most of us have long since learned to take such stories with at least a few hefty pinches of salt, given how often rumours of a fourth installment and/or remake have arisen this past decade or so. But in this instance, confirmation came quite swiftly from one of the highest possible sources, and – as is so often the case these days – it came via an exchange on Twitter: Read the full story from


4 Common Health Care Myths: Test Yourself
When it comes to medical care, you really can have too much of a good thing. Take, for example, the routine use of antibiotics to treat sudden infections of the middle ear (acute otitis media). This condition is the most common reason antibiotics are prescribed for children in the U.S. And yet most ear infections in children will safely clear up on their own within a few days without antibiotic treatment. Treatment for pain relief may be all that is necessary. Antibiotics may be given if symptoms worsen. Read full story from

Native American:

Assembly of First Nations Kicks Off National Assembly
First Nations from across Canada are gathering in Moncton, New Brunswick, this week, hosted by the Mi’kmaq and Maliseet Nations, as representatives from 633 First Nations gather to discuss resource development and other aboriginal priorities, including education.

Starting on July 12, hundreds of First Nations chiefs, youth, elders, dignitaries and citizens will gather at the group’s National Assembly to strategize and create an action plan to address indigenous priorities under the theme “The Spirit of Peace and Friendship,” according to an AFN statement. Read full story from

Healthy Communities Focus of Cherokee Nation Conference
TULSA, Okla. — More than 150 representatives from communities across northeastern Oklahoma recently participated in a two-day conference on building healthy communities held recently in Tulsa.

The Creating Healthy Communities Action Institute, sponsored by Cherokee Nation, featured discussions and presentations on creating healthy eating and active living environments, healthy school changes, how complete streets lead to healthy environments and economies, food policies, commercial tobacco control and more.

“Our goal is to help create healthy communities by making the healthy choice the easy choice,” said Lisa Pivec, director of Cherokee Nation Healthy Nation.  “In the spirit of gadugi, we work to form partnerships with schools, state and local governments and other organizations to accomplish this goal.” Read full story from


Church Won’t Accept Cash From Catholics Who Voted for Equality
A Catholic bishop is refusing to accept a donation from a New York assemblyman in retribution for his backing of marriage equality.

As he’d been doing for 20 years, Assemblyman Joe Lentol, a Brooklyn Democrat, sent his annual $50 donation to a scholarship fund at the Our Lady of Mount Carmel Parish School. But the New York Daily News  reports that it got returned with word that Brooklyn bishop Nicholas DiMarzio won’t allow any donations from politicians who voted for same-sex marriage. Read full story from


Comments on new atheist movie ‘The Ledge’
There are few faithy topics that get our readers talking like atheism does.

Our Friday story about “The Ledge,” a new atheist-themed movie that’s trying to do for nonbelievers what “Brokeback Mountain,” did for gays and lesbians, drew nearly 4,000 comments.

A few commenters noted that the movie fits a recent trend of atheist evangelism: Read full story from

Local kids learn from famous wizard
The welcoming witch met wide eyes and giggles.

With her best British accent, Demi Fair greeted boys and girls June 30 at Paul Smith Library of Southern York County.

She checked her scroll to make sure they were registered. Then the magical child left the muggle world behind.

Fair, program director at the library, and Dawn Stockbridge, children’s program director, designed a four-week summer camp to simulate Harry Potter’s first year at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry from J.K. Rowling’s popular series. Read full story from


Feel free to leave comments regarding the articles posted.

If you’re interested in guest blogging or would like to submit an article or event, contact me at

Thanks for stopping by! Well wishes to you all, have a great day!


News & Submissions 12/28/2010

Tuesday, December 28th, 2010

What is paganism, really?

Who wrote the dictionary on the word paganism exactly? The World English Dictionary defines this interesting umbrella term as “a member of a group professing a polytheistic religion or any religion other than Christianity, Judaism, or Islam” then in the second definition names a pagan as “a person without any religion; heathen.” Pagan, to The Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary, is a term that describes a person who “belong[s] to a religion which worships many gods, especially one which existed before the main world religions.” Its origins span as far back as to the early Roman empire as another word for “civilian” compared to “miles Christi” (Soldiers of Christ). More derivations conclude the simple-minded ridiculed “country bumpkins,” “outsiders,” and “hicks.” Basically an episode of Glee. The pagans are the underdog, the overseen and underrated. At least in word alone, causing animosity through time of medieval Witch hunts, the obsession with magic and outside misunderstanding of human mortality in a organized religion. Read full story from

A Cultural History of the Moon
The book “Moon: A Brief History,” with its wide variety of illustrations from classical texts, science fiction and other sources, describes not just the history of the celestial body but the ways it inspired the human imagination to take flight, fueled, as Proust put it, by “the ancient unalterable splendor of a Moon cruelly and mysteriously serene.” Read full story from

2010: A Good Year For Neanderthals (And DNA)
This year was a good year for Neanderthals. Yes, they did go extinct about 30,000 years ago, but scientists now say their genes live on — in us.

Scientists also found a 40,000-year-old finger in a Siberian cave that apparently belonged to an unknown human-like creature. And hair from the corpse of a 4,000-year-old hunter revealed his blood type and a predisposition for baldness.

What made these discoveries possible was DNA, which is becoming biological science’s window into the past. Read full story from

Harry Potter was a good Christian?
In a new book out this month, author Danielle Tumminio asserts Harry Potter is good Christian. Tumminio argues Potter lives a life that lines up with Christian values.

“I see him best as a seeker in a world where Christianity is not the vocabulary. I see him best as a seeker trying to live a life of faith in the same way a Christian seeker tries to live a life grace,” Tumminio told CNN.

Tumminio said she wrote God and Harry Potter at Yale: Teaching Faith and Fantasy Fiction in an Ivy League Classroom, to explore the contention by conservative Christians that Harry Potter is akin to heresy. Read full story from

Neanderthals cooked and ate vegetables
Neanderthals cooked and ate plants and vegetables, a new study of Neanderthal remains reveals.

Researchers in the US have found grains of cooked plant material in their teeth.

The study is the first to confirm that the Neanderthal diet was not confined to meat and was more sophisticated than previously thought.

The research has been published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The popular image of Neanderthals as great meat eaters is one that has up until now been backed by some circumstantial evidence. Chemical analysis of their bones suggested they ate little or no vegetables. Read full story from

Palm oil in our everyday products pushing indigenous peoples off their land
It’s the usual morning rush. You put your makeup on, take a dry creamer in your morning cup of coffee, luxuries we don’t give a thought to in the U.S. What – luxuries?

When it’s “pushing indigenous peoples off their lands,” it’s a luxury, said Victoria Tauli-Corpuz, chair of the U.N. Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues. “Hundreds are murdered and thousands are forced off their land of origin to grow the palm oil that goes in your cosmetics.”

Besides deforesting land for palm oil plantations, the controversial crop also used in biofuels, detergents, toothpaste and foods has fueled a ruthless landgrab by paramilitary groups in Colombia’s rural areas. In a desperate bid to protect themselves Colombia’s Internally Displaced People have set up “Humanitarian Zones” on small patches of collective land. Read full story from

Santeria faith in Park City: decapitated animals are telltale sign of followers
The decapitated animals discovered in Park City in mid-December appear to have been killed in sacrificial ceremonies conducted by people practicing a faith that originated in Africa, an expert said in an interview, affirming a suspicion by local investigators that the animals were killed as part of some sort of ceremony.

Don Rimer, who spent 30 years as a law enforcement officer and now provides training in the fields of ritual crimes and the occult, said the decapitated animals are telltale evidence of people who practice a faith known as Santeria. Followers brought the faith with them to the New World when they were taken from Africa during the slave trade, first establishing themselves in the Caribbean region, he said. Santeria is a blend of ancient African religion and Catholicism, Rimer said. Read full story from

WRIGHT WAY: Behind New Year’s Day
The New Year celebration is considered the oldest holiday observance in history, dating back some 4,000 years to Babylon. It was also known as Akitu and it lasted 11 days. Each day had its own unique celebration.

The carnival atmosphere laced with laughter, food and drinks epitomized each new year celebration as the most vibrant occasion of Mesopotamia, according to Some form of a New Year’s celebration is performed around the world by people of all cultures.

In fact, it would be difficult to understand our days of the week and months of the year without considering the origin of New Year’s Day. Why is this true?

According to The World Book Encyclopedia, “The Roman ruler Julius Caesar established Jan. 1 as New Year’s Day in 46 B.C. The Romans dedicated this day to Janus, the god of gates, doors and beginnings. The month of January was named after Janus, who had two faces — one looking forward and the other looking backward.”

Although the Romans continued celebrating the new year into the first century, the early Christians condemned their festivities as paganism. Centuries later the church began having its own religious observances concurrently with many pagan celebrations, blending the two, including New Year’s Day. Read full story from

News & Submissions 11/19/2010

Friday, November 19th, 2010

Astronomers Discover Alien Planet In Our Milky Way
We’ve talked about colliding galaxies on this blog before. But this piece of science news today is a little weirder: The journal Science reports that astronomers have found the first extragalactic exoplanet in our Milkyway. Read full story from

Ghost caught on camera
People who are open to the supernatural see ghosts everywhere. For instance a speck of dust as it moves on an air current and caught in a camera flash becomes an ‘orb’: a ball of otherworldly energy left by the souls of the departed. Read full story from

Cherokee Nation News Release
The Cherokee Nation is in the beginning stages of developing a Virtual Library of Cherokee Knowledge, a web-based system designed to provide Cherokee citizens and the general public access to a comprehensive digital space filled with authentic Cherokee knowledge related to the tribe’s history, language, traditions, culture and leaders. Read full story from

Scientists capture antimatter atoms in particle breakthrough
(CNN) — Scientists have captured antimatter atoms for the first time, a breakthrough that could eventually help us to understand the nature and origins of the universe.

Researchers at CERN, the Geneva-based particle physics laboratory, have managed to confine single antihydrogen atoms in a magnetic trap.

This will allow them to conduct a more detailed study of antihydrogen, which will in turn allow scientists to compare matter and antimatter. Read full story from

Fox News gets Sitting Bull history wrong
WASHINGTON – In the same week Fox News President Roger Ailes assailed President Barack Obama for being un-American, the Fox News website attempted to paint the president as out of touch for admiring Indian Chief Sitting Bull. But the network got its history wrong. Read full story from

Stoneham library revisits Spiritualism movement
Stoneham — Séances and medium meetings may sound like the practices of Salem witches, but these rituals were actually common in Stoneham, according to a local historian.

Spiritualism, which supports the idea that the dead can communicate with the living, was a popular belief among middle-class residents in Stoneham in the l870s, according to Medford historian Dee Morris. This Thursday, Nov. 18, Morris, who has been studying spiritualism for the past 15 years, discussed some of Stoneham’s most influential spiritualists in a free discussion at the Stoneham Public Library. Read full story from

BLOODSTONE Border Morris, pagans and druids gathered at the Longstone last Sunday (October 31) to celebrate the pagan festival of Samhain that falls on Halloween.

First the Morris dancers roused the spirits of the noontime gatherers at the Neolithic monument with a selection of their jaunty dances, incorporating stick brandishing and sparring along with menacing snarls and grimaces. Read full story from

Bridgewater State offers magical course for those who grew up with Harry Potter
BRIDGEWATER —When her 11th birthday had come and gone, Kelsey Bergeron was disappointed that she hadn’t gotten an invitation to the Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry.

Now 18, Bergeron still loves the Harry Potter book and film series she grew up with, and she has a unique opportunity to study them in college.

The Bridgewater State University freshman is enrolled in “The Ethics of Harry Potter,” a sociology seminar that relates the themes of J.K. Rowling’s fantasy series to the ideas of Aristotle. Read full story from


Harmony Movie Trailer from Balcony Films on Vimeo.

Bad boy rapper Shyne goes kosher (Source