Sunday Morning Post

March 13th, 2011 by sivodd

Aleister Crowley’s influence on Colin Batley and his followers
A WELSH expert on the occult said Colin Batley and his disciples weren’t true followers of satanist Aleister Crowley – they were just perverts.

Oxford-educated Mogg Morgan, of Newport, who runs Mandrake Publishing, said Batley and his followers just blamed the notorious writer for their own moral failings.

At their homes in Clos yr Onnen, Kidwelly, Batley and his followers laminated copies of texts by Crowley, who died in 1947, so they could be read out.

Crowley, who established his own cult called Thelema, was known as the “Great Beast”. His favourite saying was: “Do what though wilt”.

His fans claim Crowley’s bisexuality, fascination with the occult and use of drugs was just a rebellion against the socially rigid conventions of his time. And he has been cited as an influence by famous figures including Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page, who bought Crowley’s former home and set up an occult bookshop and publishing house which reprinted some of his writings. Read full story from walesonline.co.uk

Move over Charlie Sheen, meet Wales’ real-life warlock
Move over Charlie Sheen… meet a real warlock.

Hollywood’s bad-boy star may have made headlines declaring himself a tiger-blood drinking warlock, but Llangollen’s Cerwyn Jones is the real deal.

The 52-year-old father-of- three, who carries a five-inch ceremonial knife for moonlight rituals, this week appeared in a North Wales court because his blade was seen as an offensive weapon.

Sympathetic magistrates accepted he was a genuine follower of the religion of Wicca – or white witchcraft – and agreed to lift the nighttime curfew imposed as a punishment whenever there is a full moon.

Jones told Wales on Sunday he discovered his faith during four years living in a tent at the stunning Horseshoe Pass near his home in Llangollen.

Speaking at his house surrounded by his neo-pagan imagery, including a pentacle, his holly wood staff, a carving of the lord of the woods and dressed in his pilgrim’s garb, he said the fundamental basis of his belief was to harm no-one, and that he spent his time peering into other people’s dreams. Read full story from walesonline.co.uk

Martha Corey
Who are you? Bonita McCoy, 60, South Heidelberg Township, a registered nurse and director of the surgical technology program at the Reading Hospital School of Health Sciences.

Who are you portraying? Martha Corey (1630-1692), a respected member of Salem, Mass., society and of the local church.

Why is this woman historically significant? In early 1692, three women were accused of witchcraft by young girls in the town. These women were perceived as social outcasts, misfits, and were not members of the church. However, Martha Corey was a respected citizen.

She was critical of the young girls and had the audacity to publicly and vehemently denounce the witch trials and the judges involved in the hearings.

Corey was then accused of witchcraft by the girls on March 11, 1692. She was tried and convicted of witchcraft and was hanged Sept. 22, 1692. Read full story from readingeagle.com+

‘Ghost’ forces Kondhwa school to shut
Sultan Shaikh of Kondhwa is not willing to send his children to school. The children say they are scared to even step into the school as they feel it is haunted. Last Monday, almost all students of Lady Haleema Begum Urdu School, Kondhwa, fled after what they claim was supernatural activity in school. Read full story from indianexpress.com

Dear St Patrick . . . Love, Ireland
Dear St Patrick – First of all, congratulations on 1,600 years of achievement. You’re probably in the top five most famous saints worldwide. Dublin has expanded your feast day into a week-long festival. You still stop traffic on Fifth Avenue every March 17th. And all this despite the fact that you were never formally canonised.

You even have a cross named after you: the red diagonal one on the Union Jack. My sources tell me that a saint normally had to be martyred, like George and Andrew, to earn such an honour, whereas, by all accounts, you died of natural causes. In one version you were 119 at the time. Anyway, I’m not asking how you got the rules bent. Just well done.

The success of your global brand aside, there’s bad news too. Paganism has made a big comeback in Ireland, although you’ll be glad to know that, except at certain music festivals and anti-motorway protests, druids are a thing of the past. Is it true, by the way, that the “snakes” you banished were just a metaphor for the druids’ serpentine symbols, or did Wikipedia make that up? Read full story from isrishtimes.com+

Court allows ‘warlock’ out to break curfew on full moon nights to perform Wicca ritual
For  a warlock who worships the goddess of the moon,  curfews can be a bit of a hindrance.

So when Cerwyn Jones found himself being punished by a court for carrying a five-inch ceremonial knife in a pub he was quick to plead special Wiccan circumstances.

The 52-year-old was sentenced to four months of staying indoors between the hours of 7pm and 7am.

But magistrates agreed to suspend the order on four nights after hearing he needed to go out during a full moon to practise his Wicca faith.

Wicca – or white witchcraft – is a neo-pagan religion which saw a resurgence in popularity in the 20th century.

Its followers believe the whole cosmos is alive and as such the waxing, waning and full moon are extremely important.

During the full moon, ‘magic’ ceremonies are performed and the gods and goddesses of Wicca are honoured. These ceremonies may be officiated by a chosen warlock and most groups meet at least once a month, timing celebrations to coincide with the full moon. Read full story from mailonline.co.uk

Where doomsday fears come from (source NECN)

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